Misery By Anton Chekhov Free Essay Example (2022)

This sample essay on Misery By Anton Chekhov reveals arguments and important aspects of this topic. Read this essay’s introduction, body paragraphs and the conclusion below.

What Work Does He Do

The Misery by Anton Chekhov

1. Misery is a short story written by Anton Chekhov. Constance Garnett translated it from Russian to English. Chekhov began writing with the purpose of raising funds for his medical education at Moscow University and upkeep for his family. In 1884, the author graduated from the University and began his medical practice.

In 1886, he published his acclaimed work, Misery. The story in question revolves around Iona Potapov, an old sledge driver. It is set a week after Potapov’s son dies in a hospital, during 19th Century Russia. Other characters in the story are a military officer, three young men, a house porter and a sleepy cabman. Potapov’s horse also plays a role in the story’s proceedings. The characters mentioned, have a significant role in bringing forward Chekhov’s ideals.

Anton Chekhov proposes that human beings have no concern for each other’s hardships. Various instances in the short story show this.

(Video) 'Misery' by Anton Chekhov | Free Essay Sample

The story begins with Iona seeking for a customer in the snowy town. Eventually, a military officer boards his sledge. Chekhov portrays the officer as an impatient and rude character. During the ride, he is as a cautious person just as well. When Iona attempts to inform him of his grief, the officer does not pay attention. They reach their destination and the old man gets new customers, three young men.

The young men are obnoxious and rowdy. They pay Iona an unfair fare for the ride. When the old man attempts to inform them of his son’s death, one of the young men rubbishes Iona’s words. The young men impatiently get off the sledge at their destination. The old man decides to end his day by going to the yard. Unfortunately, he has not made enough money to feed his horse with oats. At the yard, he meets a young sledge driver. He wishes to share his grief with him, but the sleepy young man continues with his sleep. Chekhov’s story ends with Iona detailing the loss of his son to his horse as no one else seems concerned with his affairs.

Chekhov is a brilliant writer. Several aspects of his writing are admirable. First, his introduction of Iona is impressive. He uses a highly descriptive style. Chekhov first describes the evening. He then describes how snow fell on that occasion, and its effect on the people and objects in the area. (Chekhov 168). Through this, the writer informs his readers that the story begins at the evening and ends at night. This instance also provides us with the season during which the story takes place. The writer also introduces the old man’s hardship through his stillness, in thought.

Chekhov also provides the reader with a good description of the old man’s poor driving. He explains that the old man is restless. The writer compares the sledge’s seat to thorns. Chekhov also describes the old man’s difficulty in focusing on the road ahead. Iona, therefore, drives the sledge in a hazardous manner, nearly causing an accident. This situation provokes the military officer to speak to Iona. In turn, the old man sees this as the opportunity to justify his current state. Iona tells the officer of his son’s death. However, the officer interrupts the speech with his commands. The author uses a descriptive style to highlight the hunchback’s response to Iona’s hardship. He describes the manner which the hunchback licks his lips and coughs. This instance helps in showing the hunchback’s reluctance to share the old man’s grief.

Anton Chekhov’s depiction of the characters is admirable. He develops them alongside the story’s argument. The military officer is a dismissive character. First, he assumes that Mr. Potapov is asleep by laying still. The officer asks the old man whether he is asleep or not (Chekhov 169). During the ride, Iona speaks to his passenger. At first, he assumes that the officer is ready to listen to the story of his son’s death. However, the officer closes his eyes and pretends to be deep in thought as the old man commences his story. The military officer portrays the notion that people lack genuine concern for each other’s affairs. Chekhov implies that people also take advantage of each other’s hardships in the story. He uses the three young men to portray this notion. The old man picks them up despite a terrible price for the sledge ride. (Chekhov 170). The writer explains that the old man has lost concern for the fare as his grief has occupied his mind. The three have an unsympathetic character. In response to the old man’s story, the hunchback cuts him off and tells him that they shall all die (Chekhov 172). The author portrays the sleepy cabman as a selfish person. He considers his sleep more important than listening to the old man. The writer explains that when Iona began to speak, the young man was fast asleep.

(Video) MISERY by Anton Chekhov, Russian audiobook 1

Chekhov’s portrayal of grief in the story is admirable. He introduces the old man as a person stricken with grief to an extent that he is immobile. The author depicts Iona Potapov as a person who has separated himself from the society around him, and to an extent, reality. Chekhov describes the old man as white as a ghost, due to snow covering his body. Chekhov further highlights the old man’s stillness. This serves as a portrayal of his grief. When the military officer arrives, he thinks that the old man is asleep. However, he is simply sitting still in thought. The atmosphere in the story is described as dull and cold. This depiction is brought forward by Chekhov’s description of the weather. At the end of the story, the writer describes the old man’s lack of cash. As a result, he misses a meal, and his horse has to eat hay. This further contributes to the reader’s perception of the old man’s bad day.

After finding no one to share his misery with, he switches to contemplation and watching his surroundings. Chekhov (174) writes, “Can he not find among these thousands someone who will listen to him? However, the crowds flit by heedless of him and his misery…His misery is immense, beyond all bounds. If Iona’s heart were to burst and his misery flow out, it would flood the whole world, it seems, but it is not seen. It has found a hiding-place in such an insignificant shell that one would not have found it with a candle by daylight…” Through this instance, Anton Chekhov depicts his theme of loneliness. His choice of words further enables the reader familiarity with Iona’s miserable situation. In the end, the old man decides to share his grief with his horse. After all, nobody else is interested in sharing his story. The writer informs us that Mr. Potapov’s horse listens to him as it feeds on hay.

Chekhov’s story raises many questions in a readers mind. In the story, the author tackles the old man’s situation casually. A reader wonders whether misery and isolation is a daily phenomenon. From the text, the author depicts sadness as a matter of daily occurrence. Chekhov informs us that the old man’s sadness leaves for a short while, and then comes back heavier than before. The answer provided is unsatisfactory. This is proven when contemporary life is taken into consideration. Not every day happens to be a miserable day.

The author has taken a disdainful stance towards the female gender. The writer implies that women are of minimal importance, and all they do is weep during serious situations. This is a derogatory pronouncement. In his efforts to create conversation with the young man, Iona should have thought of a different subject. The writer’s words may upset an audience consisting of the female gender. In the story, Chekhov implies that no person bothered to listen to Iona Potapov’s story of hardship, only an animal did. The author describes the anxiety the old man felt as he looked at the crowd. When it hits him that all the people he sees are strangers, and none is concerned with his bereavement, his pain intensifies. From that, readers wonder whether humans are so cold and ignorant of one another, focusing on themselves instead. Chekhov should have provided at least one instance of an understanding person. It is a reader’s opinion that strangers may not be compassionate to an individual’s suffering. It does not concern them, and they will try to maintain their distance. Furthermore, a reader may deduce that the writer’s sick state of health, at the time of writing, may have disoriented his thoughts on society’s positive aspects. However, Chekhov’s story is highly successful in showing that people have little concern for each other’s problems.

2. Towards the end of the story, Chekhov explains Iona’s desire to speak to someone by comparing his desire for a conversation with the aforementioned man’s thirst. When he discovers that the younger man is asleep, he thinks of what he can use as a conversation starter. However, he ends up talking to his white mare. He tells the horse, “That’s how it is, old girl. . . . Kuzma Ionitch is gone. . . . He said goodby to me. . . . He went and died for no reason. . .(Chekhov 174)” The writer explains that Iona’s horse eats as it listens to the old man. Chekhov tells us that this simple act carries away the old man. From this, a reader may deduce the ending as a relatively happy one. The writer has solved the conflict of the story. The old man yearns for someone to listen to what he had to say, throughout the story. Amazingly, the horse grants his wish, as he feeds it hay.

(Video) Analysis of Short Story “The Management of Grief” by Bharati Mukherjee | Free Essay Sample

However, Chekhov should have adopted a different end to the story. An ending with the man talking to the horse is unsatisfactory. A horse is incapable of providing compassion to the old man. Furthermore, the horse is unable to understand the old man’s problems. Furthermore, it is an assumption that the old man knew the horse was listening to him. After all, the writer describes that the old man was carried away as he spoke to the horse (Chekhov 175). As stated earlier, Chekhov wishes to show that people have lost compassion for each other, during times of suffering. Towards the end of his story, Chekhov contradicts his earlier proposition. The writer states that the old man had not earned enough to pay for his horse’s oats. He relates this situation to the misery he has experienced throughout that day. The old man further states that people who have enough to eat ate always happy with their situation (Chekhov 174). From that instance, the old man implies that his misery is attributable to lacking enough money, and in consequence, food. That statement discounts the old man’s earlier need to share his grief, on his son’s death, with strangers. An appropriate ending should reflect the writer’s earlier argument on the old man’s grief.

The best ending would be right before the author says, “His misery is immense, beyond all bounds. If Iona’s heart were to burst and his misery to flow out, it would flood the whole world, it seems, but it is not seen. It has found a hiding-place in such an insignificant shell that one would not have found it with a candle by daylight. . . .(Chekhov 170).” In that scenario, the story ends with an aura of misery. Iona wished for a person to listen to him, which nobody did. This ending enables the story to maintain relevance to the stated theme. Scenarios such as the talk with his horse, and the young man, are cut down on. Such an ending also emphasizes the cruelty of people, as portrayed by the crowd. The story has a dull mood, as described by the weather and speech. The proposed ending will enhance the story’s mood. Furthermore, at the chosen point in the story, a reader experiences its climax. An ending at the suggested point will serve to enhance literary tools such as suspense to the reader.

In the story, Anton Chekhov presents an interesting argument. He implies that humans have lost concern for their counterparts in the society. Various instances justify this thought, in the story. This article supports the aforementioned notion. However, it also mentions differing ideals, to provide an argument to Chekhov’s views. The writer’s positive aspects receive acknowledgement in the essay. Just as well, the article raises various propositions, for the purposes of improving the story. In this light, the essay provides an appropriate alternative to the previous ending.

Works Cited

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(Video) 92 Misery A sad ASMR short story by Anton Chekhov.

Chekhov, Anton P, Okla Elliott, Kyle Minor, and Constance Garnett. The Other Chekhov. Fort Collins, Colo.: New American Press, 2008. Print.

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FAQs

What is Chekhov's overall message in Misery? ›

The theme of “Misery” by Anton Chekhov of misery, as the title suggests it, and loneliness. According to Heri Nurdiyanto, the story is about “how one man's grief is ignored by the public, just when he needs someone's attention the most” (Nurdiyanto).

What is irony Misery? ›

The irony in "Misery" is all contained in the fact that the simple old man imagines he can communicate his misery with a dumb animal. Irony is usually something that would be funny if it were not so painful or pathetic. Some people might laugh at him if they saw him.

What is the main conflict in the story Misery? ›

The main conflict in Chekhov's "Misery" is Man versus Society. Iona Potapov is miserable after the death of his son, and what he wants to do is talk to someone about it. But as a cab driver, he must focus on his job. He has a few passengers—a soldier and, later, three youths—but none of them will listen.

What is the main theme in Anton Chekhov? ›

Disillusionment and Failed Ideals

Chekhov's stories examine many kinds of disappointment and failed ideals. Often the protagonists are disillusioned by events that force them to reevaluate their personal philosophies and understanding of the world, and this disillusionment usually occurs toward the end of stories.

How did Stephen King get the idea for Misery? ›

One of Stephen King's inspirations for Misery was the reaction his fans had to his 1984 novel The Eyes of the Dragon. Many fans rejected The Eyes of the Dragon because it was an epic fantasy book, with virtually none of the horror that initially made his reputation.

What did Iona understand at the last? ›

5. What did Iona understand at the end? Ans: Iona has suffered a lot of pain while his son was ill, then when he died and his funeral, his words before he died and the last days that he had at the hospital.

What are the 5 examples of irony? ›

Common Examples of Situational Irony
  • A fire station burns down. ...
  • A marriage counselor files for divorce. ...
  • The police station gets robbed. ...
  • A post on Facebook complains about how useless Facebook is. ...
  • A traffic cop gets his license suspended because of unpaid parking tickets. ...
  • A pilot has a fear of heights.

What are the 3 types of irony? ›

The three most common kinds you'll find in literature classrooms are verbal irony, dramatic irony, and situational irony. Verbal irony occurs whenever a speaker tells us something that differs from what they mean, what they intend, or what the situation requires.

What is the climax of Misery? ›

The climax of Misery sees Paul finally gain the upper hand with Annie, allowing him to kill her once and for all. In the next scene, we pick up with him 18 months later out to lunch with his agent Marcia (Lauren Bacall).

What kind of man is Iona? ›

Iona Potapov is an older man. As the story begins, he is described as 'all white like a ghost. ' He sits alone is his horse-driven sleigh waiting for a fare. Snow is falling, and he lets it cover him while he sits 'bent as double as the living body can be bent.

How does Chekhov view society? ›

Chekhov also intentionally refrained from delivering moral or political sermons in his literary works or his public statements. Born into the first generation of a family of freed serfs, Chekhov felt that inner freedom was more important than political or social freedom.

What is Ivan's conclusion about life at the end of the story? ›

At the end of the story, Ivan believes "The past is linked with the present by an unbroken chain of events flowing one out of another." This leads him to think that "truth and beauty which had guided human life there in the garden and in the yard of the high priest had continued without interruption to this day . . . . ...

Why is Anton Chekhov important? ›

Why is Anton Chekhov so influential? Chekhov captured life in the Russia of his time by using a deceptively simple technique devoid of obtrusive literary devices. He is regarded as the outstanding representative of late 19th-century Russian realism.

Is Misery a real story? ›

Although the events of "Misery" aren't ripped from any real-life ordeal, the book itself (which King listed as one of his favorites during an interview on "The Late Show with Stephen Colbert") does appear to have been spawned from the writer's personal demons.

Who is the hero of the story the lament? ›

Iona the main character in the story is a poor cab driver, who has lost his son and is mourning his death.

Why is Iona sad in the story? ›

Iona, the protagonist of the story, was an old cab driver. He was like a phantom in the society because he was lonely and longed for a companion to share his emotions. He had recently lost his only son and family member and felt intense grief and sorrow at his terrible loss.

Why is it important for Iona to tell about his son's death? ›

Iona tells the story of his son's death to the horse because no one else will listen to him.

What is the irony of life? ›

Irony is also something that has a different or opposite result from what is expected: [ C ] It is one of the ironies of life that by the time you have earned enough money for the things you always wanted, you no longer have the energy to enjoy them.

Why is irony important to a story? ›

Why is it important? Authors can use irony to make their audience stop and think about what has just been said, or to emphasize a central idea. The audience's role in realizing the difference between what is said and what is normal or expected is essential to the successful use of irony.

What is real irony? ›

Irony occurs when what actually happens turns out to be completely different from what would be expected. In writing or speaking, irony involves using words so the intended meaning is the opposite of the literal meaning.

What is a cruel irony? ›

A situation or event that is cruel is very harsh and causes people distress.

What are the 10 examples of irony? ›

Common Examples of Irony
  • Telling a quiet group, “don't speak all at once”
  • Coming home to a big mess and saying, “it's great to be back”
  • Telling a rude customer to “have a nice day”
  • Walking into an empty theater and asking, “it's too crowded”
  • Stating during a thunderstorm, “beautiful weather we're having”

What is the best definition of tragic irony? ›

tragic irony in British English

noun. the use of dramatic irony in a tragedy (originally, in Greek tragedy), so that the audience is aware that a character's words or actions will bring about a tragic or fatal result, while the character is not. Collins English Dictionary.

What is the plot of the story the lament? ›

The story tells about a father and his great despair for his dead son. Iona, the father, is a Russian sleigh driver who desperately tried to share his grief with strangers. Iona wanted someone to listen to him, to somehow feel his grief, in order for him to feel better.

When was Chekhov's Misery written? ›

"Misery" (Russian: Тоска, romanized: Toska) is an 1886 short story by Anton Chekhov.

Why does Iona decide to tell his story to the horse? ›

Why does Iona decide to tell his story to the horse? So that the horse will understand why he didn't make enough money to buy oats. Because speaking about his sadness will make him feel better, even if it is only to a horse. Because the horse once had a colt that died, and will understand how he must feel.

Chekhov’s story ends with Iona detailing the loss of his son to his horse as no one else seems concerned with his affairs.. The officer asks the old man whether he is asleep or not (Chekhov 169).. In response to the old man’s story, the hunchback cuts him off and tells him that they shall all die (Chekhov 172).. At the end of the story, the writer describes the old man’s lack of cash.. In the story, Chekhov implies that no person bothered to listen to Iona Potapov’s story of hardship, only an animal did.. Towards the end of the story, Chekhov explains Iona’s desire to speak to someone by comparing his desire for a conversation with the aforementioned man’s thirst.. . .(Chekhov 174)” The writer explains that Iona’s horse eats as it listens to the old man.. However, Chekhov should have adopted a different end to the story.. After all, the writer describes that the old man was carried away as he spoke to the horse (Chekhov 175).

Misery by Anton Chekhov is one of the most famous works of the author and one of the saddest short stories written in the twentieth century.. The analysis essay on Anton Chekhov’s story demonstrates that, while Iona is continuously trying to share his grief with someone, anyone at all, but no one seems to care.. The author describes the extent of his misery when he writes that “If Iona’s heart were to burst and his misery to flow out, it would flood the whole world, it seems, but yet it is not seen” (Chekhov).. In the summary of the short story “Misery,” it is explained that, as Iona reaches home, another part of his misery is revealed, which is poverty.. The symbolism in the story can be seen when Iona realizes that he will never find a person who would care about his misery or even pretend to do so and decides to share the memories of his son with a white mare, which is not able to speak but is always by his side.. The ending of the story is rather sad because Iona fails to find even a single human being to share his grief and has to settle with an animal, which is a symbol of his loneliness.. Though Iona is relieved to be able to talk to someone finally, the fact remains that it is an animal with which Iona shares his feelings and not a human being who can understand the grief and respond to it.

Throughout, the use of the old man’s narrative perspective enables the reader to understand misery of Iona, the old man, through an approximate stream of consciousness technique which deals with the real flow of human thoughts.. The beginning of the story unfolds on quite depressing and heavy atmosphere, where there is “full of monstrous lights, of unceasing uproar and hurrying people” in “familiar gray landscapes” which seem to relate to Iona’s grief and misery.. He is even described as “white as a ghost” to underline the fact that he is lifeless; Iona is here just because death came at the “wrong door.” In addition to this, pathetic fallacy is also notable, since nature reflects the state of mind of Iona, who does not even bother to shake off the snow that falls on him.. The passengers that Iona meets reflects people in real life who fail to understand the grief of others just because they are all so preoccupied with their own life.. The way the passengers treat him gives the impression that Iona is a slave who ought not have feelings instead of Iona earning his life honestly.. Although human beings live in the same world, the dichotomy between the people Iona encounters and the grief that Iona feels in the same world is noted when the wording “merry gentleman” is used in contrast to “the old man.” “Me-er-ry gentleman” reflects the life of the revelers, where there is no worry, while Iona is leading an empty life, with no one besides himself.. The narrative perspective does sympathize with Iona but does not condemn the other characters for not listening to Iona’s grief.. But, even if the horse does not respond to Iona and it keeps “munching,” at least it neither gives orders to Iona nor does it judge Iona for feeling miserable.. Many readers can in fact relate to Iona’s suffering because at one point in time, we have all felt misunderstood and alone despite being among people.. The narrative perspective employed by Chekhov enables the readers to understand Iona and sympathize with him.

Throughout, the use of the old man’s narrative perspective enables the reader to understand misery of Iona, the old man, through an approximate stream of consciousness technique which deals with the real flow of human thoughts.. The beginning of the story unfolds on quite depressing and heavy atmosphere, where there is “full of monstrous lights, of unceasing uproar and hurrying people” in “familiar gray landscapes” which seem to relate to Iona’s grief and misery.. He is even described as “white as a ghost” to underline the fact that he is lifeless; Iona is here just because death came at the “wrong door.” In addition to this, pathetic fallacy is also notable, since nature reflects the state of mind of Iona, who does not even bother to shake off the snow that falls on him.. The passengers that Iona meets reflects people in real life who fail to understand the grief of others just because they are all so preoccupied with their own life.. The way the passengers treat him gives the impression that Iona is a slave who ought not have feelings instead of Iona earning his life honestly.. Although human beings live in the same world, the dichotomy between the people Iona encounters and the grief that Iona feels in the same world is noted when the wording “merry gentleman” is used in contrast to “the old man.” “Me-er-ry gentleman” reflects the life of the revelers, where there is no worry, while Iona is leading an empty life, with no one besides himself.. The narrative perspective does sympathize with Iona but does not condemn the other characters for not listening to Iona’s grief.. Not only did people from the upper class not notice his suffering, people from the same social class as Iona could not notice it too.. But, even if the horse does not respond to Iona and it keeps “munching,” at least it neither gives orders to Iona nor does it judge Iona for feeling miserable.. Many readers can in fact relate to Iona’s suffering because at one point in time, we have all felt misunderstood and alone despite being among people.. Iona, too, feels alone although his job enables him to encounter with people.

A lot of students, including myself, did not think that one can feel several emotions from a short story such as this piece by Chekhov.. Your involvement in the story can become difficult to ignore.The story began with the main character named Iona waiting in the streets on his mare while the snow showered on him.. Furthermore, things got complicated when the soldier yelled at him for not driving well and Iona only answered about what happened to his son.. So Iona waited again in the snow for another passenger.. He found that he was not sleepy, but did not find anyone to talk to.The climax of the story was when Iona thought about the things which happened during the period of his son’s suffering and death.. But his son was taken instead.With this, he went to his mare and gave her some oats he was able to purchase with the day’s earnings.. When he talked to his mare about the death of his son, the mare did not answer back and looked as if she was listening.. The story showed how a man so miserable can resort to a lot of instances some will call insane.. The story was introduced with a man who waited in the snow for a passenger.. The spirit to live on vanished along with his son’s death.The theme of the story regards the deep love of a father to his son.. Although the latter part of the story showed Iona’s thoughts, his earlier actions contradicted it.. To elaborate further, it was written in the text that he had hoped that he could stop working as a driver because his son can take over.. But the story further showed that he took note of how his son suffered prior to his passing.. I firmly believe that Iona loved his son.. Choose skilled expert on your subject and get original paper with free plagiarism. report

Misery is a short story that was written by Anton Chekhov.. Iona attempts to express his feelings to several people but they all refuse to listen to him.. The young lad is sad because he wishes to express his feelings to Mangan’s sister but doesn’t know-how.. “If Iona’s heart were to burst and his misery to flow out, it would flood the whole world, it seems, but yet it is not seen.”(Spack, 41). This book expresses the theme of misery and sadness.. The boy in Araby faces the same situation as Iona in Misery since they both encounter several people.. The boy in Araby is miserable because he does not know how he can express his feelings to Mongol’s sister.. (Rosenberg, 204) Iona encounters several people but none of them are willing to listen to him.. Misery is centered in the mind of Iona Bobatov whereas Araby is focused on the thoughts of the boy.. Misery and Araby are set in dull environments.. Iona gives up trying to talk to humans and opens his heart to his mare.. The boy in Misery is still sad at the end of the story.. This critical writing on “Misery” by Anton Chekhov and “Araby” by James Joyce was written and submitted by your fellow. student.

The author of this story seems to set a humorous mood, in that he wants the reader to know that pulling off such an event destroying a home may be devastating to the victim, but accomplishing such an event takes a clever mind.. This story sets the mood of difficult times being present after the war and what an actual gang might have been .... Word Count: 850 Approx Pages: 3 Grade Level: High School. Word Count: 310 Approx Pages: 1 Grade Level: High School. The first two lines sets the mood of the poem - the horror and starkness of life in the war.. The innocent die through the effects of "incurable" sores - painfully, slowly - without dignity The finale of the poem is a desperate plea, a begging for, an end to the pain, an end to the agony, an end to the misery, an end to the acceptance of such pointless death..... Word Count: 988 Approx Pages: 4 Grade Level: High School. ... Job 7:2-7 shows us his depressive mood: "Like a slave longing for the evening shadows, or a hired man waiting eagerly for his wages, so I have been allotted months of futility, and nights of misery have been assigned to me.. Word Count: 1848 Approx Pages: 7 Grade Level: High School. Expresses the two different settings, but the importance of the settings are not really the place, but the mood the world has with and without the symphony.. Word Count: 411 Approx Pages: 2 Grade Level: High School. When compared to "Beowulf," the literary merit of "The Dream of the Rood," "The Wanderer" and "The Wife's Lament" are that of difficult syntax, expression of life through sad tribulations, and moods of pride.. The stories have got difficult syntax, expression of life through sad tribulations, and moods of pride, all qualities of the epic poem "Beowulf.. Not only doe's music set the mood, but so does dancing.

Misery by Anton Chekhov is one of the most famous works of the author and one of the saddest short stories written in the twentieth century.. The story begins with the description of Iona Potapov, a sled driver who is also the protagonist of the story.. The analysis essay on Anton Chekhov’s story demonstrates that, while Iona is continuously trying to share his grief with someone, anyone at all, but no one seems to care.. The author describes the extent of his misery when he writes that “If Iona’s heart were to burst and his misery to flow out, it would flood the whole world, it seems, but yet it is not seen” (Chekhov).. In the summary of the short story “Misery,” it is explained that, as Iona reaches home, another part of his misery is revealed, which is poverty.. The symbolism in the story can be seen when Iona realizes that he will never find a person who would care about his misery or even pretend to do so and decides to share the memories of his son with a white mare, which is not able to speak but is always by his side.. The ending of the story is rather sad because Iona fails to find even a single human being to share his grief and has to settle with an animal, which is a symbol of his loneliness.. Though Iona is relieved to be able to talk to someone finally, the fact remains that it is an animal with which Iona shares his feelings and not a human being who can understand the grief and respond to it.

Read more May 24, 2019 by Essay Writer. Us and the Other: Humanity in William Faulkner’s The Bear William Faulkner’s short novel The Bear is a rich story of characters going through rites of passage to understand themselves […]. Resurrection in A Tale of Two Cities. Communicating the Nuclear: Narrative Analysis of ‘About a Mountain’. Examining Lost Identity and Dignity through Stevens. Stoic Communication: Understanding Quiet Suffering through Mrs. Dalloway and The Hours. Virginia Woolf’s novel Mrs. Dalloway uses themes that scrutinize the environment of interwar England, which inhibited the ability to effectively communicate one’s thoughts and feelings, because the cultural norm dismissed […]. Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, published […]

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EssayHub.net (2022, July 30) Inner Life Characters Anton Chekhov Misery.. EssayHub.net - Accessed July 30, 2022. https://essayhub.net/essays/inner-life-characters-anton-chekhov-misery-assignment. The following essay deals with the revelation of the inner side of the various characters that have been portrayed in the concerned short story in discussion, Misery, composed by the famous Russian playwright, Anton Chekhov.. Misery is one of the short stories of Anton Chekhov that was first published in the Peterburgskaya Gazeta in the year 1886 after which the short story had been republished for many times in various anthologies and finally underwent some minor changes after which it gained entry into the third volume of the Collected Works of Anton Chekhov.. The story finds it end with the fact that the bereaved father starts talking to his own horse after facing a lack of reciprocation from all the human beings whom he had approached for sharing his own grief.. The critics stated that Misery is one of those masterpieces of the Russian short story writer that portrays the actual face of the concerned society that is revealed by the way they deal with the bereaving father who had lost his only son.. The story does not have any supporting character unless the reader considers the horse of the protagonist of the story to be one of the characters of the story.. The four passengers that the concerned cab owner ferries to their destination might only be termed to be strangers due to the fact that they have not shown any kind of humane interaction with the concerned cab driver who had been grieving the loss of his only son[1].. The cab reaches the destination in sometime and the old man is again left in the snow with no companion except his own horse.. The reader financial that the passengers of the sleigh do not display any kind of concern or compassion for the old cab -driver who had just lost his only son in the recent times.. At the yard, the cab driver finds a young man who is present at the yard and gets elated with the thought that he had finally found some human being with whom he could share his grief.

Videos

1. Misery by Stephen King - Book Talk
(JeremyFee)
2. misery by stephen king book talk
(Claire Keel)
3. Aunty Lisa's Prison Island Misery
(The Aunty Lisa Show)
4. Misery
(Brucie Tan)
5. Just finished Misery! Summary and Final Thoughts!
(Michelle-Lynn)
6. Misery, a poem.
(Athaya Almira)

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