GRIEF by Anton Chekhov (2022)

Short Classics

THE WOODTURNER Grigori Petrov, long known as an excellent craftsman and at the same time as the most good-for-nothing peasant in the whole Galchinsky district, is taking his sick old wife to the local hospital. He has to drive some twenty miles, and moreover the road is terrible, hard enough for a government postman to deal with, not to mention such a lazybones as the woodturner Grigori. A sharp, cold wind blows right in his face. In the air, wherever you look, big clouds of snowflakes whirl, so that it is hard to tell whether the snow is coming from the sky or from the earth. Neither the fields, nor the telegraph poles, nor the forest can be seen through the snowy mist, and when an especially strong gust of wind hits Grigori, he cannot even see the shaft bow. The decrepit, feeble little nag barely trudges along. All her energy is spent on pulling her legs out of the deep snow and tossing her head. The woodturner is in a hurry. He fidgets restlessly on the box and keeps whipping the horse’s back.

“Don’t you cry, Matryona…,” he mutters. “Hold out a little longer. God grant we’ll get to the hospital, and in a flash you’ll be, sort of…Pavel Ivanych will give you some little drops, or order a blood-letting, or maybe he’ll be so kind as to rub you with some sort of spirits, and that will…ease your side. Pavel Ivanych will do his best. He’ll scold, stamp his feet, but he’ll do his best…He’s a nice gentleman, well-mannered, God grant him good health…

“As soon as we get there, he’ll come running out of his quarters and start calling up all the devils. ‘What? How’s this?’ he’ll shout. ‘Why don’t you come at the right time? Am I some sort of dog, to bother with you devils all day long? Why didn’t you come in the morning? Out! So there’s no trace of you left! Come tomorrow!’ And I’ll say: ‘Doctor, sir! Pavel Ivanych! Your Honor!’ Get a move on, devil take you! Hup!”

The woodturner whips his nag and, not looking at the old woman, goes on muttering under his breath:

“ ‘Your Honor! Truly, as before God himself…I swear, I set out at daybreak. How could I make it here on time, if the Lord…the Mother of God…turned wrathful and sent such a storm? Kindly see for yourself…A nobler horse wouldn’t even have made it, and mine, kindly see for yourself, isn’t a horse, it’s a disgrace!’ Pavel Ivanych will frown and shout: ‘We know your kind! You always find some excuse! Especially you, Grishka! I’ve known you a long time! No doubt you stopped off maybe five times at a pot-house!’ And I say to him: ‘Your Honor! What am I, some sort of villain or heathen? The old woman’s rendering up her soul to God, she’s dying, and I should go running around to the pot-houses? Mercy, how can you? Let them all perish, these pot-houses!’ Then Pavel Ivanych will have you carried into the hospital. And I’ll bow down to him…‘Pavel Ivanych! Your Honor! I humbly thank you! Forgive us, cursed fools that we are, don’t take offense at us peasants! You should have kicked us out, but you kindly went to the trouble and got your feet covered with snow!’ And Pavel Ivanych will glance at me as if he’s about to hit me and say: ‘Instead of bowing at my feet, you’d do better, you fool, to stop guzzling vodka and pity your old woman. You could use a good whipping!’ ‘Exactly so, Pavel Ivanych, a good whipping, God strike me dead, a good whipping! And how can I not bow at your feet, if you’re our benefactor and dear father? Your Honor! I give you my word…as if before God…spit in my face if I’m lying: as soon as my Matryona here recovers and is her old self again, anything Your Grace cares to order from me, I’ll be glad to make! A cigar box of Karelian birch, if you wish…croquet balls, I can turn bowling pins just like the foreign ones…I’ll do it all for you! I won’t take a kopeck for it! In Moscow a cigar box like that would cost you four roubles, but I won’t take a kopeck.’ The doctor will laugh and say: ‘Well, all right, all right…I get it! Only it’s too bad you’re a drunkard…’ I know, old girl, how to talk with gentlemen. There’s no gentleman I couldn’t talk with. Only God keep us from losing our way. What a blizzard! My eyes are all snowy.”

And the woodturner mutters endlessly. He babbles away mechanically, so as to stifle his heavy feeling if only a little. He has many words on his tongue, but there are still more thoughts and questions in his head. Grief has come suddenly, unexpectedly, and taken the woodturner by surprise, and now he cannot recover, come to his senses, figure things out. Up to then he had lived serenely, as if in a drunken half-consciousness, knowing neither grief nor joy, and now he suddenly feels a terrible pain in his soul. The carefree lazybones and tippler finds himself all at once in the position of a busy man, preoccupied, hurrying, and even struggling with the elements.

The woodturner remembers that the grief began the previous evening. When he came home the previous evening, a bit drunk as usual, and from inveterate habit began cursing and shaking his fists, the old woman glanced at her ruffian as she had never done before. Usually the expression of her old-woman’s eyes was martyred, meek, as with dogs that are much beaten and poorly fed, but now she looked at him sternly and fixedly, as saints on icons or dying people do. It was with those strange, unhappy eyes that the grief began. The dazed woodturner persuaded a neighbor to lend him a horse, and he was now taking his old wife to the hospital, hoping that Pavel Ivanych, with his powders and ointments, would restore the old woman’s former gaze.

“And you, Matryona, well…,” he mutters. “If Pavel Ivanych asks you if I beat you or not, say: ‘No, never!’ And I won’t beat you anymore. I swear to God. Do you think I beat you out of spite? I beat you just so, for nothing. I pity you. Another man wouldn’t care much, but see, I’m driving…I’m trying hard. And the blizzard, what a blizzard! Lord, Thy will be done! Only grant we get there and don’t lose our way…What, your side hurts? Matryona, why don’t you say anything? I’m asking you: does your side hurt?”

(Video) Grief by Anton Chekhov: English Audiobook with Text on Screen, Classic Literature Short Fiction

It seems strange to him that the snow does not melt on the old woman’s face, that the face itself has become somehow peculiarly long, acquired a pale-gray, dirty-wax color, and become stern, serious.

“What a fool!” mutters the woodturner. “I speak to you in all conscience, like to God…and you…What a fool! I just won’t take you to Pavel Ivanych!”

The woodturner lets go of the reins and falls to thinking. He cannot bring himself to turn and look at the old woman: scary! To ask her something and not get an answer is also scary. Finally, to put an end to the uncertainty, without turning to look, he feels for the old woman’s cold hand. The raised hand drops back limply.

“So she died! What a chore!”

And the woodturner weeps. Not so much from pity as from vexation. He thinks: how quickly it all gets done in this world! His grief had barely begun, and the ending was already there waiting. He had barely begun to live with his old wife, to talk with her, to pity her, when she up and died. He had lived with her for forty years, but those forty years had passed as if in a fog. With all the drinking, fighting, and poverty, life had not been felt. And, as if on purpose, the old woman died just at the very moment when he felt that he pitied her, could not live without her, was terribly guilty before her.

“And she went begging,” he recalls. “I sent her out myself to ask people for bread—what a chore! She should have lived a dozen more years, the fool, but she probably thinks this is how I really am. Holy Mother of God, where the devil have I got to? It’s not treatment she needs now, it’s burial. Turn around!”

The woodturner turns around and whips up his nag with all his might. The road gets worse and worse every moment. Now he cannot see the shaft bow at all. Occasionally the sledge rides over a young fir tree, a dark object scratches his hands, flashes before his eyes, and the field of vision again becomes white, whirling.

(Video) Grief by Anton Chekhov

“To live life over again…,” thinks the woodturner.

He remembers that forty years ago Matryona was young, beautiful, cheerful, from a rich family. They gave her to him in marriage because they were seduced by his craftsmanship. There were all the makings for a good life, but the trouble was that he got drunk after the wedding, dropped off, and it was as if he never woke up until now. The wedding he remembers, but of what came after the wedding—for the life of him, he cannot remember anything, except maybe that he drank, slept, fought. So forty years vanished.

The white snowy clouds gradually begin to turn gray. Darkness falls.

“Where am I going?” The woodturner suddenly rouses himself. “I’ve got to bury her, not go to the hospital…I must be in a daze!”

He turns around again and again whips up the horse. The mare strains with all her might and, snorting, trots along. The woodturner whips her on the back again and again…He hears some sort of knocking behind him, and though he does not turn around, he knows that it is the deceased woman’s head knocking against the sledge. And it grows darker and darker around him, the wind turns colder and sharper…

“To live it all over again,” thinks the woodturner. “To get new tools, take orders…give the money to the old woman…yes!”

And here he drops the reins. He feels for them, wants to pick them up and cannot; his hands no longer obey him…

(Video) Grief By Anton Chekov

“Never mind…,” he thinks. “The horse will go by herself, she knows the way. I could do with some sleep now…till the funeral or the memorial service.”

The woodturner closes his eyes and dozes off. A short while later he hears that the horse has stopped. He opens his eyes and sees something dark in front of him, like a hut or a haystack…

He ought to climb down from the sledge and find out what it is, but there is such laziness in his whole body that he would rather freeze to death than move from his place…And he falls peacefully asleep.

He wakes up in a big room with painted walls. Bright sunlight pours through the windows. The woodturner sees people around him and wants first of all to show that he is a man of dignity and understanding.

“What about a little Panikhida, brothers, for the old woman?” he says. “The priest should be told…”

“Well, enough, enough! Just lie there!” Someone’s voice interrupts him.

“Good Lord! Pavel Ivanych!” The woodturner is surprised to see the doctor before him. “Y’ronor! My benefactor!”

(Video) Misery by Anton CHEKHOV | Short Story | FULL Unabridged AudioBook

He wants to jump up and throw himself at the feet of medicine, but feels that his arms and legs do not obey him.

“Your Honor! Where are my legs? My arms?”

“Say goodbye to your arms and legs…They got frozen. Now, now…what are you crying for? You’ve lived, thank God for that! You must have lived some sixty years—that will do you!”

“Grief!…Y’ronor, it’s such grief! Kindly forgive me! Another five or six little years…”

“What for?”

“I borrowed the horse, I’ve got to return it…Bury the old woman…How quickly it all gets done in this world! Your Honor! Pavel Ivanych! A cigar box of the best Karelian birch! Croquet balls…”

The doctor waves his hand and walks out of the ward. Woodturner—amen!

(Video) Grief by Anton chekov

1885

FAQs

What is the story grief about? ›

A grieving father reaches the end of his rope, and decides to commit suicide. After the sudden loss of his young son, Kyle Harden tortures himself day-after-day by returning to his once happy home where he, his wife, and son all lived.

What was Iona's grief about? ›

Iona the main character in the story is a poor cab driver, who has lost his son and is mourning his death. As a human being he wants to share his grief to his fellow human beings but non of them pay any attention to it. In the story he first tried to talk to the officer who hired him to go to Viborg Way.

What does the cabdriver want in Chapter grief? ›

Ans. This is a story about an old man, Iona Potapov, who is full of grief because his young son has died. He is a cab driver. He wants to talk to his passengers about the death of his son.

How do we know of Iona's Misery or grief? ›

''Misery'' by Anton Chekhov

'' Iona is suffering from intense grief after the sudden death of his son. He's compelled to connect with another person with whom he can share his story, but everyone he meets is too self-centered or cruel to listen.

What are stages of grief? ›

Persistent, traumatic grief can cause us to cycle (sometimes quickly) through the stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance. These stages are our attempts to process change and protect ourselves while we adapt to a new reality.

Who wrote the story grief '? ›

Short Stories: Grief by Anton Chekhov. The turner, Grigory Petrov, who had been known for years past as a splendid craftsman, and at the same time as the most senseless peasant in the Galtchinskoy district, was taking his old woman to the hospital. He had to drive over twenty miles, and it was an awful road.

Who is the protagonist of the short story grief? ›

Ans. The old man in grief is a sledge driver. He is the protagonist of the story.

What is the cause of cab drivers Misery grief? ›

The old cab driver's misery is great as he lost his son and has no one to share his grief with. Misery is a story by Anton Chekhov, about an old cab driver Iona Potapov who drives a horse-drawn sled in St. Petersburg, Russia. He already had lost his wife and daughter and his son was his only companion.

What is the theme of the story lament? ›

Answer: The central theme of the story, as the title would suggest, is "Misery." Iona Potapov, the driver, takes several fares and each time tries to share his grief with his passengers. unburden himself by sharing his grief and so continues on, "white like a ghost."

What was Lona willing to tell everyone? ›

What was Iona willing to tell everyone? Ans: Iona loses his son after being in the hospital for three days. He has a heartbreak and wanted to share this story with everyone. 4.

Who is lona Potapov? ›

Answer. Lona Potapov is an older man. As the story begins, he is described as 'all white like a ghost. ' He sits alone is his horse-driven sleigh waiting for a fare.

Why is Iona sad in the story? ›

Iona, the protagonist of the story, was an old cab driver. He was like a phantom in the society because he was lonely and longed for a companion to share his emotions. He had recently lost his only son and family member and felt intense grief and sorrow at his terrible loss.

What is the irony of Misery? ›

The irony in "Misery" is all contained in the fact that the simple old man imagines he can communicate his misery with a dumb animal. Irony is usually something that would be funny if it were not so painful or pathetic. Some people might laugh at him if they saw him.

What is the hardest stage of grief? ›

Depression is usually the longest and most difficult stage of grief.

What is the cause of grief? ›

People grieve for many different reasons, including: Death of a loved one, including pets. Divorce or changes in a relationship, including friendships. Changes in your health or the health of a loved one.

What is the purpose of grief? ›

Grieving is purely an individual experience. The ultimate goal of grief and mourning is to take you beyond your initial reactions to the loss. The therapeutic purpose of grief and mourning is to get you to the place where you can live with the loss in a healthy way.

How long is notes on grief? ›

Product Details
ISBN-13:9780593320808
Publication date:05/11/2021
Pages:80
Sales rank:37,220
Product dimensions:4.80(w) x 7.00(h) x 0.70(d)
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May 11, 2021

Who is Iona's second fare? ›

The first is just one man, while the second consists of three men. The first fare is a military officer. As soon as Iona starts driving, the officer begins to complain. He observes that Iona is driving erratically, weaving all over the street.

Who is Iona's first passenger? ›

The first passenger was a polite army man who listened to him politely as he shared his tragedy. The army man interrupts Iona and points out his reckless driving. Grief-stricken and discontent, Iona receives three intoxicated young men as his passenger soon after.

What is the name of Iona's son? ›

' asks the officer. Iona twists his mouth into a smile and, with an effort, says hoarsely: 'My son, Barin, died this week.

Why does one tell the story of his son's death to the horse? ›

Iona tells the story of his son's death to the horse because no one else will listen to him.

Why does Lona decide to tell his story to the horse? ›

Why does Iona decide to tell his story to the horse? So that the horse will understand why he didn't make enough money to buy oats. Because speaking about his sadness will make him feel better, even if it is only to a horse.

Why is Anton Chekhov important? ›

Why is Anton Chekhov so influential? Chekhov captured life in the Russia of his time by using a deceptively simple technique devoid of obtrusive literary devices. He is regarded as the outstanding representative of late 19th-century Russian realism.

How does the narrator try to find out more about the girl? ›

Answer: When the girl arrives in the compartment, he utilizes his other sensory perceptions to discern details about her, such as assuming the people with her are her parents due to the anxiety in their voices out of concern for her safety.

Why does Iona Potapov look like a phantom? ›

The cabdriver, Iona Potapov, is quite white and looks like a phantom: he is bent double as far as a human body can bend double; he is seated on his box; he never makes a move. If a whole snowdrift fell on him, it seems as if he would not find it necessary to shake it off.

What was the Colour of the horse the lament? ›

His little horse is also quite white, and remains motionless; its immobility, its angularity and its straight wooden-looking legs, even close by, give it the appearance of a gingerbread horse worth a kopek.

What kind of man is Iona? ›

Iona Potapov is an older man. As the story begins, he is described as 'all white like a ghost. ' He sits alone is his horse-driven sleigh waiting for a fare. Snow is falling, and he lets it cover him while he sits 'bent as double as the living body can be bent.

When was Chekhov's Misery written? ›

"Misery" (Russian: Тоска, romanized: Toska) is an 1886 short story by Anton Chekhov.

What impression of the character of Iona do you get from this story? ›

Answer : Iona, the protagonist of the story, was an old cab driver. He was like a phantom in the society because he was lonely and longed for a companion to share his emotions. He had recently lost his only son and family member and felt intense grief and sorrow at his terrible loss.

Who is lona Potapov? ›

Iona Potapov is an older man. As the story begins, he is described as 'all white like a ghost. ' He sits alone is his horse-driven sleigh waiting for a fare. Snow is falling, and he lets it cover him while he sits 'bent as double as the living body can be bent.

How do you describe the feeling of grief? ›

Shock, denial or disbelief.

It is natural for our minds to try to protect us from pain, so following a loss some people may find that they feel quite numb about what has happened.

How do you represent grief? ›

Objects or Phenomenons That Symbolize Death and Mourning
  1. Candles. Candles are common during funerals, memorials, and other death traditions. ...
  2. Clocks. ...
  3. Flag at half-mast. ...
  4. The color black. ...
  5. Skull. ...
  6. Scythe. ...
  7. Tombstones.
Jul 16, 2021

What is an example of a short story? ›

"The Tale of Peter Rabbit" by Beatrix Potter tells the story of a mischievous little rabbit who doesn't listen to his mother and goes through a heart-pounding chase with Mr. McGregor.

Who is the protagonist of the short story grief? ›

Ans. The old man in grief is a sledge driver. He is the protagonist of the story.

What is the theme of the lament? ›

Answer: The theme of "Lament" is that grief can be experienced in a frozen way and buried under trivia and cliches, such as that "life goes on" after a person dies. The speaker has apparently just lost her husband. Her tone is almost emotionless, as if she is shell-shocked by the news.

Who is Iona's second fare? ›

The first is just one man, while the second consists of three men. The first fare is a military officer. As soon as Iona starts driving, the officer begins to complain. He observes that Iona is driving erratically, weaving all over the street.

Is grief a theme? ›

Grief was a recurring theme in art and literature, both during and after the war. Like everyone else, artists and writers struggled to make sense of the losses around them, and in many cases they also mourned their own personal losses and dealt with their own grief in their work.

Why Is grief a powerful emotion? ›

Grief is even more powerful, subtle, and complex. This is why it is so overwhelming. It is an amalgam of all our most powerful feelings in a distressing roiling cauldron of emotion. It is anger at the injustice, bitterness about the loss, fear for the future, regrets about the times you were less than perfect.

What is the cause of grief? ›

People grieve for many different reasons, including: Death of a loved one, including pets. Divorce or changes in a relationship, including friendships. Changes in your health or the health of a loved one.

What is the color for grief? ›

Wearing dark colours for mourning has long been a tradition in many parts of the western world, in particular large parts of Europe and North America. The association of the colour black with death and loss is centuries old and is believed to have originated during Roman times.

What flowers symbolize grief? ›

China, Korea and Japan use white chrysanthemums to symbolize grief.

What is a good sentence for grief? ›

Grief sentence example. To the grief of his mother he left the Roman church. She exhibited great grief at his death. The grief was so strong that it became a nauseating pain.

Who is the character in the story? ›

A character is any person, animal, or figure represented in a literary work. Characters are essential to a good story, and it is the main characters that have the greatest effect on the plot or are the most affected by the events of the story.

What is the best story ever? ›

12 Novels Considered the “Greatest Book Ever Written”
  • Anna Karenina. Greta Garbo in Anna Karenina. ...
  • To Kill a Mockingbird. To Kill a Mockingbird. ...
  • The Great Gatsby. F. ...
  • One Hundred Years of Solitude. Gabriel García Márquez. ...
  • A Passage to India. E.M. Forster. ...
  • Invisible Man. Ralph Ellison. ...
  • Don Quixote. Don Quixote. ...
  • Beloved. Toni Morrison.

Which is the best story to read? ›

Best Short Stories and Collections Everyone Should Read
  1. “Lamb to the Slaughter” by Roald Dahl. ...
  2. “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson. ...
  3. “How to Become a Writer” by Lorrie Moore. ...
  4. “Cat Person” by Kristen Roupenian. ...
  5. “Cathedral” by Raymond Carver. ...
  6. “A Good Man Is Hard to Find” by Flannery O'Connor. ...
  7. “Symbols and Signs” by Vladimir Nabokov.
Jun 17, 2018

And Pavel Ivanitch will give me a look as though he would like to hit me, and will say: 'You'd much better not be swilling vodka, you fool, but taking pity on your old woman instead of falling at my feet.. I give you my word, ... here as before God, ... you may spit in my face if I deceive you: as soon as my Matryona, this same here, is well again and restored to her natural condition, I'll make anything for your honor that you would like to order!. "I say, Matryona, ..." the turner muttered, "if Pavel Ivanitch asks you whether I beat you, say, 'Never!'. She ought to have lived another ten years, the silly thing; as it is I'll be bound she thinks I really was that sort of man ... Holy Mother!. "To live over again," thought the turner.. It was all over with the turner.

Iona's Grief : In Brief : (What was Iona's grief ?). Iona for his old cab.. Question 2 : How many passengers can sit in Iona's cab at a time ?. Answer : Two passengers can sit in Iona's cab at a time.. Question 2 : Did the cab driver listen to his story ?. So it was necessary for Iona also to tell his grief to somebody.. But city people are no so.

Please God we shall reach the hospital, and in a trice it will be the right thing for you ... Pavel Ivanitch will give you some little drops, or tell them to bleed you; or maybe his honor will be pleased to rub you with some sort of spirit -- it'll ... draw it out of your side.. The turner lashed his nag, and without looking at the old woman went on muttering to himself:. And Pavel Ivanitch will give me a look as though he would like to hit me, and will say: 'You'd much better not be swilling vodka, you fool, but taking pity on your old woman instead of falling at my feet.. 'You are right there -- a thrashing, Pavel Ivanitch, strike me God!. I give you my word, ... here as before God, ... you may spit in my face if I deceive you: as soon as my Matryona, this same here, is well again and restored to her natural condition, I'll make anything for your honor that you would like to order!. The turner, stupefied with amazement, borrowed a horse from a neighbor, and now was taking his old woman to the hospital in the hope that, by means of powders and ointments, Pavel Ivanitch would bring back his old woman's habitual expression.. "I say, Matryona, ..." the turner muttered, "if Pavel Ivanitch asks you whether I beat you, say, 'Never!'. At last, to make an end of uncertainty, without looking round he felt his old woman's cold hand.. And the turner cried.. She ought to have lived another ten years, the silly thing; as it is I'll be bound she thinks I really was that sort of man ... Holy Mother!. "To live over again," thought the turner.. Grigory turned round again, and again lashed his horse.. The turner lashed it on the back time after time ... A knocking was audible behind him, and though he did not look round, he knew it was the dead woman's head knocking against the sledge.. You've lived your life, and thank God for it!

Misery by Anton Chekhov is one of the most famous works of the author and one of the saddest short stories written in the twentieth century.. The title of the story does justice to the theme of the story, which is of loneliness, misery, and the need to communicate one’s feelings.. The story begins with the description of Iona Potapov, a sled driver who is also the protagonist of the story.. As the story goes forward, Iona’s daily encounter with his customers reveals his loneliness.. The analysis essay on Anton Chekhov’s story demonstrates that, while Iona is continuously trying to share his grief with someone, anyone at all, but no one seems to care.. The author describes the extent of his misery when he writes that “If Iona’s heart were to burst and his misery to flow out, it would flood the whole world, it seems, but yet it is not seen” (Chekhov).. In the summary of the short story “Misery,” it is explained that, as Iona reaches home, another part of his misery is revealed, which is poverty.. The symbolism in the story can be seen when Iona realizes that he will never find a person who would care about his misery or even pretend to do so and decides to share the memories of his son with a white mare, which is not able to speak but is always by his side.. The ending of the story is rather sad because Iona fails to find even a single human being to share his grief and has to settle with an animal, which is a symbol of his loneliness.. Though Iona is relieved to be able to talk to someone finally, the fact remains that it is an animal with which Iona shares his feelings and not a human being who can understand the grief and respond to it.. The theme of “Misery” by Anton Chekhov of misery, as the title suggests it, and loneliness.. It is one thing when a person does not know, but deciding to ignore Iona even after knowing about his misery brings forth the dark side of humans.. As the analysis of “Misery” by Anton Chekhov shows, he does it because he could not find a person even after trying so hard.

Chekhov repeatedly satirizes the belief that suffering is intrinsic to human existence and should be accepted as inevitable and ignored, portraying the stoical view of suffering as a means some people use to ignore or dismiss the suffering of others.. While Chekhov recognized that reflection can lead to more suffering he also shows how our ability to reflect on our suffering can lead us to recognize suffering in others and feel compassion for them.. He argues that “suffering leads man to perfection” 4 and that alleviating suffering would lead people to “abandon religion and philosophy,” 4 the thoughts of a doctor who has become insensitive to the suffering of his patients.. Have you any idea of suffering?” 4 Gromov goes on to explain to the doctor how his philosophy has arisen out of a life absent of any real suffering, describing it as a “convenient philosophy” for the lazy “sluggard.” 4 Ragin’s philosophy is laid bare when by a twist of irony he is later believed to be insane and forcibly admitted to Ward No.. Chekhov’s career as a doctor gave him particular insight into how doctors respond to the suffering of their patients.. Chekhov’s observations can be of great service in encouraging healthcare professionals to reflect on the nature of suffering and how humans respond to it, to view the patient as a suffering person rather than a collection of symptoms and signs as medical education encourages.. John L. Coulehan argues in his essay Tenderness and Steadiness: Emotions in Medical Practice, 10 that it is not enough for the doctor to look on as a detached sympathiser but it is necessary that the doctor “imaginatively experiences,” i.e. empathises with the position of the patient.

A woman arranges a visit with a reluctant young man.. The family lawyer goes to the Boerum house to visit Charlie, who’s wife, Jessie, has died.. Anna’s mother was killed a few months ago in a car accident.. It helped them during their grief, and they started looking after it.. L. T. likes to tell the story of how his wife left him, but he doesn’t like talking about how she’s likely dead now, a victim of the Axe Man.. Arriving home from work one day he found the garage door open and her car gone.. A married couple, their son, and a teacher are taking a long car ride.. The previous day, the couple’s two-year-old daughter had died in a fire.. She sees you and starts talking about her son.. Two women, married to two brothers, received the news that their husbands had been killed on consecutive days.

Us and the Other: Humanity in William Faulkner’s The Bear William Faulkner’s short novel The Bear is a rich story of characters going through rites of passage to understand themselves […]. Resurrection in A Tale of Two Cities. Communicating the Nuclear: Narrative Analysis of ‘About a Mountain’. Examining Lost Identity and Dignity through Stevens. Stoic Communication: Understanding Quiet Suffering through Mrs. Dalloway and The Hours. Virginia Woolf’s novel Mrs. Dalloway uses themes that scrutinize the environment of interwar England, which inhibited the ability to effectively communicate one’s thoughts and feelings, because the cultural norm dismissed […]. Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, published […]

“Sledge to Vyborgskaya!” Iona hears.. Iona gives a wry smile, and straining his throat, brings out huskily: “My son… er… my son died this week, sir.”. “Well, drive on,” says the hunchback in his cracked voice, settling himself and breathing down Iona’s neck.. Iona feels behind his back the jolting person and quivering voice of the hunchback.. Iona looks round at them.. And Iona hears rather than feels a slap on the back of his neck.. And Iona turns round to tell them how his son died, but at that point the hunchback gives a faint sigh and announces that, thank God!. Iona drives a few paces away, bends himself double, and gives himself up to his misery.. “Let’s go out and have a look at the mare,” Iona thinks.. “Are you munching?” Iona asks his mare, seeing her shining eyes.. My son ought to be driving, not I….

About Love by Anton Chekhov – This article will tell you the short story entitled, “ About Love” by Anton Checkhov with story analysis, About Love summary and theme in English.. About Love by Anton Chekhov Short Story Analysis With Summary And Theme AT lunch next day there were very nice pies, crayfish, and mutton cutlets; and while we were eating, Nikanor, the cook, came up to ask what the visitors would like for dinner.. “How love is born,” said Alehin, “why Pelagea does not love somebody more like herself in her spiritual and external qualities, and why she fell in love with Nikanor, that ugly snout — we all call him ‘The Snout’ — how far questions of personal happiness are of consequence in love — all that is known; one can take what view one likes of it.. The Short story entitled, “About Love by Anton Chekhov,” is from americanliterature.com About Love by Anton Chekhov Summary and Analysis is a precise analysis of the short story to further understand its underlying message.. TitleAbout LoveAuthorAnton ChekhovPublication Date August 1898 Setting The story, About love by Anton Chekhov , is set in Russia, both the village where Alehin lived and frequently visiting the town.. Theme The themes of connection, honor , grief , letting go , acceptance , and love are explored in Anton Chekhov’s short story About Love .. Genre Short story Moral Lesson The moral lesson we may take from Anton Chekhov’s short story About Love is that love varies from person to person and situation to situation.. Characters Alehin (Pavel Konstantinovich), Nikanor, Pelagea, Burkin, Ivan Ivanych, Luganovich, and Anna Alexyevna Summary In summary of Anton Chekhov’s “ About Love ,” two friends who were caught at a storm while out walking seek refuge in the country home of a third friend.. He appears to have worked closely with Luganovitch, the vice-president of the circuit court, when he was younger, and he made close friends with Luganovitch and his lovely wife Anna Alexyevna.Alehin and Anna spent a lot of time together over the years; he grew madly in love with her and was certain that she felt the same way.. About Love By Anton ChekhovShort Story AnalysisAbout Love By Anton Chekhov Short Story Analysis WithSummary, Characters, And Theme Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (Jan 29, 1860 – Jul 15, 1904) was a Russian surgeon who was also a world – renowned short story and playwright .. The themes of connection, honor , grief , letting go , acceptance , and love are explored in Anton Chekhov’s short story About Love .. The moral lesson we may take from Anton Chekhov’s short story About Love is that love varies from person to person and situation to situation.. Based on About Love By Anton Chekhov Short Story Analysis With Summary, Characters, three anecdotes were offered in the story to demonstrate that love is always unique.. Categories Short Story Tags a story summary , about love anton chekhov , about love anton chekhov analysis , about love anton chekhov characters , about love anton chekhov pdf , about love by anton chekhov analysis , about love by anton chekhov characters , about love by anton chekhov conflict , about love by anton chekhov full movie , about love by anton chekhov full story , about love by anton chekhov pdf , about love by anton chekhov plot , about love by anton chekhov ppt , about love by anton chekhov summary , about love class 12 questions and answers , about love class 12 summary , about love story , about love story by anton chekhov , about love summary , anton chekhov biography , anton chekhov famous works , anton chekhov pronunciation , anton chekhov quotes , anton chekhov the beggar , anton chekhov the bet , stories of anton chekhov , summary of about love by anton chekhov , the stories of anton chekhov Post navigation

In Anton Chekhov’s short story ‘Heartache’ the main character, a cabby called Iona Potapov, feels painfully alienated since he thirsts for talk but nobody is willing to listen to him.. In particular, the author focuses on the extent of communication between people of different social classes in an attempt to highlight the harshness of man and his unwillingness to help one another.. Throughout Fyodor Dostoevsky’s work, Notes from Underground, the protagonist, the underground man, portrays himself as a spiteful, self-contradictory, and overly conscious melancholy man.. The underground man is lonely and constantly vacillates between wanting society’s acknowledgment or to be socially desired and wanting to be completely isolated from society.. When George tells Lennie he can not talk Lennie does not get why this tends to make him sad and feel like he is not a typical person he feels different.

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